THE MESIAN MESSAGE 115 - JUNE 2011

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THE MESSAGE NO. 115 JUNE 2011
THE ANONYMOUS LADY'S SERIES - THIS IS A NOBODY'S EDITION



JOHN CHINNIAH WRITES

Suy Sang a regular visitor to our abode, especially during the Deepavali festivals accompanied by his wife, enjoys the briyani rice, coupled with chicken masala, spicy fried prawn, mutton and many more delicious items like muruku.

Recently he heard that I had a fall and was hurt seriously and ended with eight stitches at the back of my head. He paid me a courteous call. As usual food was already assembled on the table. I joined him for lunch. He commended the food was exceedingly delectable. After lunch we sat down and he enquired about my fall. He insisted that I write a short story about my life. So here it goes……..

I was born in a small town, which at that time was the capital of Pahang-Kuala Lipis. Pahang in general and Kuala Lipis in particular, to many residing outside the state was a jungle paradise for tigers, elephants, crocodiles and many other wild animals roaming around day and night.

Suy Sang interrupted "John, why Kuala Lipis?"

My father was attached to CEB, I explained Central Electricity Board before and now TNB. There were only two entry points to Kuala Lipis, one by road from Raub and the other by train from Kuala Lumpur to Gemas, Kuala Lipis and Kelantan. The roads were bad and winding and what more the busses were old ramshackle.

The only time that the town comes alive is when the train arrives either from Kelantan or Gemas. My father used to take me to watch the scenario. People from different walks of life, running here and there, were ascending and descending from the coaches; relatives hugging those arriving and waving goodbye to those leaving. Once the train leaves the station and disappears in the dark, the town goes to sleep again.


HOW WE LIVE AS A CONQUERED PEOPLE

Some of the interesting activities I observed, as a young boy when the Japanese invaded Malaya. My father used to take me to the town to buy household items. I observed that every entry and exit point in the town was guarded by a Japanese soldier in full uniform and armed with a gun attached with a shining pointed bayonet. Maybe it was the policy, and anyone approaching him, must stop, show reverence by bowing 90 degrees almost touching the ground. What more, if anyone tried to avoid him or take a short cut, he would shout "Bagero" followed by a slap or two and if he is angry or annoyed, one got the taste of the butt of his gun or a kick.

It was during the outing with my father, I came across Japanese soldiers and high-ranking officers, walking and standing along the road side. I also noticed that the Japanese are quite happy when you bow to them, when they least expected, which I did many many times to please them and myself.

One day, when I was with my father, there was a stomping of boots. Japanese soldiers and officers running around the whole place and anyone, who got into their way, received a kick or the butt of their gun. At this time practically all the shops were closed. My father and I took shelter in one of my father’s close friend’s provision shop. Hardly any sounds from the Japanese outside. About four to five hours later, we came out with whatever we could buy and rushed home. The next day, I learned that one of the "Anti Dai Nippon" sympathizers was caught and beheaded and the head exhibited at one of the road junctions in town.

It was common knowledge among the locals that the Japanese like to exhibit their trophy along the streets or road junctions to warn the people going against the Japanese regime. People were scared to go out at night, not because of the Japanese soldiers, but more because of the ghosts roaming around.

There were times when planes would circle around the town and rumours that the town would be flattened in due course. The public had no choice but to take cover in paddy fields, bridges and any other places they thought was safe.

Time was bad, as far as I know, during the Japanese occupation. It was tough for the local people to live quite a normal life. Less rice to eat, so people consumed more vegetables, tapioca and fish from the streams and rivers. Of course, everybody suffered from deprivation and hoped better condition of life would one day return, like what was before, and the thought and fear that the Japanese occupation will last for a long time and that would deprive their children of good education.

My father was ordered by the Japanese senior officers to send my sister and I to a nearby Japanese school. Our daily activities included watching the raising of the Japanese flag, singing a Japanese song and bowing to the Japanese senior officers and to the rising sun.

One day, there was a rumour that a battalion of British and Indian soldiers were coming by boat along the Pahang river, to rescue the locals or to replace the Japanese regime. The whole town went down to the riverbanks to welcome them. They waited for hours but no saviour army appeared.


NEWS OF THE TWO BIG BOMBS

On another occasion, the best news we heard was two bombs were dropped in Japan, and the Japanese government has surrendered and peace was restored. War had ended. There was joy and celebration among the local people. A big parade was arranged to mark the surrender of the Japanese in Kuala Lipis town field. The whole inhabitants of the town and other nearby villages came to witness the ceremony. Some walked to the field, some cycled, and some came by boat along the Pahang River. The ceremony started as early as 8.00am with the soldiers and high-ranking officers standing in 2 groups. The British one side and the Japanese the other side, in full ceremonial dress, the Japanese soldier had laid down in front of them all their belongings including pots, pans, kitchen utensils and other necessary things. About an hour later, the high-ranking British officer, walked towards the Japanese soldiers, saluted and vice versa, exchanged some words.

Then the high-ranking Japanese officer, grappled his shining sword and pulled out some of the stars on the uniform pinned on his shoulders and gave them to the British soldier. That symbolized surrender of the Japanese to the British. The British soldier then walked back to his squadron. Later the Japanese officers and soldiers were transported in a truck to take them to some unknown destination as Prisoners of War (POWS).

By this time, the public who had come to witness the ceremony surged forward, pushing my friend and I aside. The crowd grabbed all the pots and pans and everything belonging to the Japanese soldiers. In no time the field was empty and the locals walked away with their booty.

By John Chinniah. To be continued.

Next…… The British and the communist insurgency


SOUR SOP - THE CANCER CELL KILLER

Deep within the Amazon Rainforest grows a tree that could literally revolutionize what you, your doctor,  and the rest of the world thinks about cancer treatment and chances of survival. This tree is low and is called graviola in Brazil , guanabana in Spanish and has the uninspiring name "soursop" in English. The fruit is very large and the subacid sweet white pulp is eaten out of hand or, more commonly, used to make fruit drinks, sherbets and such.

Research shows that with extracts from this miraculous tree it now may be possible to:
  • * Attack cancer safely and effectively with an all-natural therapy that does not cause extreme nausea, weight loss and hair loss.
  • * Protect your immune system and avoid deadly infections.
  • * Feel stronger and healthier throughout the course of the treatment.
  • * Boost your energy and improve your outlook on life .

The source o f this information is just as stunning: It comes from one of America's largest drug manufacturers, the fruit of over 20 laboratory tests conducted since the 1970's!

What those tests revealed was nothing short of mind numbing...

Extracts from the tree were shown to:
  • * Effectively target and kill malignant cells in 12 types of cancer, including colon, breast, prostate, lung and pancreatic cancer.
  • * The tree compounds proved to be up to 10,000 times stronger in slowing the growth of cancer cells than Adriamycin, a commonly used chemotherapeutic drug!
  • * What's more, unlike chemotherapy, the compound extracted from the Graviola tree selectively hunts down and kills only cancer cells. It does not harm healthy cells! The amazing anti-cancer properties of the Graviola tree have been extensively researched -- so why haven't you heard anything about it?
If Graviola extract is as half as promising as it appears to be -- why doesn't every single oncologist at every major hospital insist on using it on all his or her patients?

The spine-chilling answer illustrates just how easily our health -- and for many, our very lives(!)--are controlled by money and power.
  • Graviola--the plant that worked too well.
  • One of America's biggest billion-dollar drug makers began a search for a cancer cure and their research centered on Graviola.
  • Various parts of the Graviola tree--including the bark, leaves, roots, fruit and fruit-seeds- -have been used for centuries by medicine men and native Indians in South America to treat heart disease, asthma, liver problems and arthritis.
Going on very little documented scientific evidence, the company poured money and resources into testing the tree's anti-cancerous properties-- and were shocked by the results. Graviola proved itself to be a cancer-killing dynamo.



WHAT HAPPENED THIS MONTH 50 YEARS AGO?
JUNE, 1961

Names mentioned in Mr. Miles diary were:

Don Turman, Ponniah, Sanium, Sohan, Tengku Aziz, Rahim, Murad, Chow Yin, Rosely, Yook Yoon, Siew Ling, Tengku Rahim, Tengku Jamil, Tengku Ariffin, Rosnah, Tengku Alamshah, Wai Mun, Samah, Nor Safian, Tengku Jamaluddin, Sabaruddin, Kenneth, Mathew, Bakri, Virasamy, Vesian, Shafie, Husin, Janan, Keat Swee, Mohd Noor Mohammad, Othman Lela, Sidek, Adanan, Latif.

There was a mention of the predicament of Mr. Richard Sidney. Remember that man who published the magazine called 'Young Malayans'. There was also a club of 'Young Malayans' formed in Bentong. I remembered it was grand occasion on the formation day of that club. However, the founder and publisher later ran into financial difficulties. Things were changing in the country and readership dipped into abysmal numbers.




DATO' TED MILES
THAT IS WHAT OUR MENTOR IS NOW CALLED

On the 17th of May, 2011, Dzukifli Ariffin came down from the Cameron Highlands. He had a mission to run. He picked up our mentor and brought him to Kuantan for onwards proceeding to Pekan. What was the errant? He brought Mr. Miles to the Pahang Sultan's Palace to receive his dato'ship honour.

At Kuantan Mr. Miles had to pick up his ceremonial dress to wear it and present himself to His Highness in the appropriate garbs. Frail though he was, yet he felt proud and honoured to be so honoured by the royalty of the state. Remember he had just had a bout of illness that knocked him out for weeks!

Guided by Dzulkifli Ariffin and his spouse, Mr. Miles stayed at the rest house. The next day was a day of rehearsals. But our mentor went through the process with high spirit though he was drained off his energy after the day.

The next day was the actual ceremony. Fortunately, an old boy of MES Datuk Murad was in-charge of palace protocol. He showed how to move around the place grounds. It was a long day of ceremony and party.


OUR HEARTIEST CONGRATULATIONS
TO
DATO' TED MILES



JAPAN - THE REST OF THE WORLD HAVE TO LEARN FROM THEM

1.THE CALM
Not a single visual of chest-beating or wild grief. Sorrow itself has been elevated.

THE DIGNITY
Disciplined queues for water and groceries. Not a rough word or a crude gesture.

THE ABILITY
The incredible architects, for instance. Buildings swayed but didn't fall.

THE GRACE
People bought only what they needed for the present, so everybody could get something.

THE ORDER
No looting in shops. No honking and no overtaking on the roads. Just understanding.

THE SACRIFICE
Fifty workers stayed back to pump sea water in the N-reactors. How will they ever be repaid?

THE TENDERNESS
Restaurants cut prices. An unguarded ATM is left alone. The strong cared for the weak.

THE TRAINING
The old and the children, everyone knew exactly what to do. And they did just that.

THE MEDIA
They showed magnificent restraint in the bulletins. No silly reporters. Only calm reportage.

10. THE CONSCIENCE
When the power went off in a store, people put things back on the shelves and left quietly.




Birthday Cake Green

HAPPY BIRTHDAY TO THE FOLLOWING IN JUNE


No.
NAME
BIRTHDAY
1
ZAINAL BIN LISUT
JUNE 1
2
MOHD NOOR MOHAMMED
JUNE 2
3
CHEONG AH MOI (MRS. HOH)
JUNE 3
4
TG. ABD. WAHAB B. TG. ABD. AZIZ
JUNE 3
5
CHEONG YET LAN
JUNE 6
6
LU AH NGAN (MRS. LAU)
JUNE 6
7
THAM CHEE LOONG
JUNE 6
8
MOHD ZABIL HJ ABD.KADIR
JUNE 9
9
HAJI ABDUL RAHIM
JUNE 10
10
TAN BENG CHIN
JUNE 12
11
LENG KAM YEE
JUNE 15
12
LOO TEE SEE
JUNE 15
13
MOHD NOOR TA'AYUN
JUNE 15
14
ONG SEK KEE
JUNE 15
15
HARBANS SINGH
JUNE 22
16
CHRISTINE CHAN FOOK THYE
JUNE 25
17
SAR KIM LEN
JUNE 29
18
YAP MING FATT
JUNE 29
19
KUPPUSAMY
JUNE 30




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Edited and written by Chan Suy Sang
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